Conservatory Floor Insulation

Conservatory Floor Insulation

Smart Ways To Keep Your Conservatory Warmer

When you are designing a new conservatory, you should carefully consider how you’re going to use conservatory floor insulation.Conservatories are often thought of as structures that can only be used in the summer months, but that couldn’t be further from the truth, and that is often the sign of a poorly insulated conservatory.

By getting underfloor insulation, you will be able to prevent heat loss through the base of your conservatory, trapping the warm air inside your property and allowing you to enjoy your conservatory all year round no matter the weather.

conservatory floor insulation

A conservatory does not have to meet the same building standards as those required for a house. Considered more often than not a ‘permitted development’, in law it is no different than a garden shed or green house that just happens to have a door leading to it from the property.

This is why the door between the conservatory and the house has to be of exterior quality, locking in any heat from escaping your main property and preventing cold air from getting in should your conservatory not be thermally efficient.

In the winter, conservatories are often a very cold space and, unless you take care when you build it, you can burn through huge amounts of money trying to keep warm. Consider that your house walls are probably 300mm thick with cavity insulation and your loft is insulated with 150 to 250 of glass fibre.

Compared to that, your conservatory is more akin to a tent. Up to fifteen percent of the heat in your conservatory will be lost through a poorly insulated floor, so why not do something about that?

To ensure that your conservatory is as thermally efficient as it can be before deciding on any structural changes to your conservatory, you can easily try out these simple time saving tips to keep your conservatory warmer. 

Soft Furnishings

Sometimes all it takes is a change of furniture. Having a sofa or soft armchairs within your conservatory improves its level of comfort, meaning that you are more likely to use it for relaxation.

However, it is best to use a throw over your furnishings when you’re not using them, preventing any bleaching that could be caused due to exposure sunlight.

Keep Doors Closed

Keeping both your exterior and interior doors closed during the winter months is a great way of trapping warm air, with each door having its own level of insulation that goes a long way to stopping heat from escaping.This also goes for windows and any rooflights or skylights that you may have in your ceiling.

 

Heaters

Using a plug-in heater, or having a radiator installed within your conservatory is also a good way of supplying heat to your conservatory during the winter months.

However, if your conservatory is not thermally sound this heat can also be lost through the floor and only add to your energy bills.

 

Carpets

Putting down a rug is a very simple solution to having cold conservatory floors, as stone and tiles are very conductive and can be unbearable to walk on in colder temperatures. Carpets and rugs, however, provide more comfort and a layer of protection for your feet.

 

If you are still struggling to feel comfortable within your conservatory, however, then maybe there is a more structural solution to your issue. For more information and advice on keeping your conservatory warm, contact us today and one of our friendly team members will be in touch to answer any questions you may have.

Cavity Wall Insulation

Whilst the subject of this blog is floor insulation, it is also very important to make sure that your walls are insulated, your double glazed windows are made to as high a standard as possible and that you apply the same high standards to your roof.

Obviously, it’s easier to ensure these things when you are starting from scratch, but if you are in the uncomfortable position of having spent a cold winter in your conservatory and you are wondering what you can do to improve things, there are still choices open to you.

If your conservatory comes with dwarf walls or brick-built sections, then you can improve the thermal security of your structure by filling it with cavity wall insulation. A standard in many homes, it is surprising how many people don’t realise the same thing can be done for your conservatory or extension.

This solution prevents heat loss through the brick walls, sealing the warmth within your home and preventing draughts and cold air from coming in through gaps in the brick.

Conservatory Floor Insulation

To prevent heat loss through the floor of your conservatory, there is a similar solution that means that your conservatory floor won’t be unbearably cold during the winter months and results in a conservatory that you can use all year round without risk of losing massive amounts of your central heating through the floor.

Once any carpeting or tiles are taken up to reveal the base underneath, 25mm insulated sheets made of polystyrene and celutex or similar screed will be laid, although the amount of insulation can vary depending on your doors clearance above the floor.

Once the sheets have been fitted, the tiles or carpet can then be re-laid. With carpet, make sure you use a good quality underlay. If you have a suspended timber floor over a concrete base, you’ll be able to make a reasonable job.

The floorboards will have to be lifted and insulation placed between the joists.

When choosing the insulation materials for your floor insulation, it is recommended to use the densest material you can find, such as solid polystyrene. This thickness and denseness improves the level of insulation, making it harder for the heat to make its way through.

Once laying this initial layer, you can then add a thin sheet of polystyrene over the whole of the floor before re-laying the floorboards, which will serve as a draught proofing layer.

If you are starting from scratch, we recommend at least 100 mm of a material such as Kingspan Ecotherm under a screed or smooth concrete finish.

If you’re laying carpet, it still pays to use a good quality underlay and if you’ve chosen to have a suspended wood floor, you should still insulate between the joists and install a draught proof sheet below putting down the floorboards.

If you are still unsure of what materials are best, or how to get started laying your underfloor insulation, then use our online contact form to speak with a member of our team who will be all too happy to talk you through all of your available options.

Underfloor Heating Options

Underfloor heating is a great idea when it comes to conservatory floor insulation, not just trapping heat but also supplying it so that you can enjoy your conservatory all year round. It is a perfect space saving solution that leaves no unsightly radiators standing in awkward locations around your new conservatory, and gives that flashy touch of modern style.

If you want your underfloor heating to be at its most effective, then it is best to opt for stone or tiled flooring, which is a much better conductor for heat than carpeting, however that is also a freely available option (although it is best not to have any thermal underlay under your carpet as this absorbs the heat and prevents you from benefiting from it.

Your Choices

Underfloor heating is an ancient technique dating back to roman times, and still provides a solid service to this day. There are two types of underfloor heating available for your conservatory floor insulation, both of which have their different benefits:

Wet underfloor heating uses hot water circulated through plastic pipes under your floor, creating a circuit that transfers the heat up through the tiled floor.

Electric underfloor heating is the cheaper option and the more popular, similar to that of an electric blanket. Using a mat system laid under the floor, this can add onto your energy bills, but will overall save you money on your central heating.

These few simple tips should help you keep comfortable, whatever the weather.

For more information on the different choices of underfloor heating, how much it will cost and what your options are, feel free to contact us today. We offer professional advice and quotes with zero obligation to you.

If you are still struggling to feel comfortable within your conservatory, however, then maybe there is a more structural solution to your issue. For more information and advice on keeping your conservatory warm, contact us today and one of our friendly team members will be in touch to answer any questions you may have.

Cavity Wall Insulation

Whilst the subject of this blog is floor insulation, it is also very important to make sure that your walls are insulated, your double glazed windows are made to as high a standard as possible and that you apply the same high standards to your roof.

Obviously, it’s easier to ensure these things when you are starting from scratch, but if you are in the uncomfortable position of having spent a cold winter in your conservatory and you are wondering what you can do to improve things, there are still choices open to you.

If your conservatory comes with dwarf walls or brick-built sections, then you can improve the thermal security of your structure by filling it with cavity wall insulation. A standard in many homes, it is surprising how many people don’t realise the same thing can be done for your conservatory or extension. This solution prevents heat loss through the brick walls, sealing the warmth within your home and preventing draughts and cold air from coming in through gaps in the brick.

Conservatory Floor Insulation

To prevent heat loss through the floor of your conservatory, there is a similar solution that means that your conservatory floor won’t be unbearably cold during the winter months and results in a conservatory that you can use all year round without risk of losing massive amounts of your central heating through the floor.
Once any carpeting or tiles are taken up to reveal the base underneath, 25mm insulated sheets made of polystyrene and celutex or similar screed will be laid, although the amount of insulation can vary depending on your doors clearance above the floor. Once the sheets have been fitted, the tiles or carpet can then be re-laid.

With carpet, make sure you use a good quality underlay. If you have a suspended timber floor over a concrete base, you’ll be able to make a reasonable job. The floorboards will have to be lifted and insulation placed between the joists.

When choosing the insulation materials for your floor insulation, it is recommended to use the densest material you can find, such as solid polystyrene. This thickness and denseness improves the level of insulation, making it harder for the heat to make its way through. Once laying this initial layer, you can then add a thin sheet of polystyrene over the whole of the floor before re-laying the floorboards, which will serve as a draught proofing layer.

If you are starting from scratch, we recommend at least 100 mm of a material such as Kingspan Ecotherm under a screed or smooth concrete finish. If you’re laying carpet, it still pays to use a good quality underlay and if you’ve chosen to have a suspended wood floor, you should still insulate between the joists and install a draught proof sheet below putting down the floorboards.

If you are still unsure of what materials are best, or how to get started laying your underfloor insulation, then use our online contact form to speak with a member of our team who will be all too happy to talk you through all of your available options.

Underfloor Heating Options

Underfloor heating is a great idea when it comes to conservatory floor insulation, not just trapping heat but also supplying it so that you can enjoy your conservatory all year round. It is a perfect space saving solution that leaves no unsightly radiators standing in awkward locations around your new conservatory, and gives that flashy touch of modern style.
If you want your underfloor heating to be at its most effective, then it is best to opt for stone or tiled flooring, which is a much better conductor for heat than carpeting, however that is also a freely available option (although it is best not to have any thermal underlay under your carpet as this absorbs the heat and prevents you from benefiting from it.

Your Choices

Underfloor heating is an ancient technique dating back to roman times, and still provides a solid service to this day. There are two types of underfloor heating available for your conservatory floor insulation, both of which have their different benefits:

  • Wet underfloor heating uses hot water circulated through plastic pipes under your floor, creating a circuit that transfers the heat up through the tiled floor.
  • Electric underfloor heating is the cheaper option and the more popular, similar to that of an electric blanket. Using a mat system laid under the floor, this can add onto your energy bills, but will overall save you money on your central heating.
  • These few simple tips should help you keep comfortable, whatever the weather.
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